Category Archives: Recipes

Cancer Fighting Dinner Recipe

We’ve talked about how garlic, beans, and cruciferous vegetables fight cancer, but we haven’t talked about how to prepare them in a delicious, easy, fast way for dinner. There’s a recipe below. BOOM, baby! Now you know.

Beans and GreensBeans and Greens

Ingredients:

1 Tb olive oil OR 3 strips bacon, chopped

1 onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 Tb chicken or beef bullion paste (or 1 packet/cube)

2-3 Tb water

4-8* cups cruciferous vegetables, frozen or fresh, chopped (broccoli slaw, kale, Cole slaw, cauliflower, etc)

1 can beans or 2 cups cooked beans, rinsed and drained

Parmesan cheese, optional

Salt to taste

*If using cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, measure 4 cups. If using kale or some other vegetable that shrinks when it cooks, measure 6-8 cups. If you hate cruciferous vegetables, use spinach. At least it’s green.

 

Directions

Heat 12″ frying pan or 6 Qt stock pot over medium or medium high heat. Add oil or bacon (fry until brown). Add onion and garlic, saute until tender. Add vegetables, bullion, and water. (If using frozen vegetables, you might not need the water.) Cook until tender, stirring occasionally. Add beans, stir. Taste, add salt, stir, taste again, repeat as necessary. Serve over rice or by itself.

 

Say to him: ‘Long life to you! Good health to you and your household! And good health to all that is yours! 1 Samuel 25:6

Advertisements

Antioxidant Rich (Green) Lemonade

Kids, this lemonade is green because it’s made from green lemons called limes. What’s that spinach doing on the counter? Um, nothing, I made a salad or something. See the lime? Green lime, green drink. Nothing funny going on here, that’s for sure. Drink up!

20171121_152020

Ingredients:

1/4 cup lemon juice OR lime juice

4 cups water

1 cup spinach or kale

2-4 packets Truvia or other natural sweetener

 

Supplies: Blender, measuring cups

Directions: Blend all ingredients until smooth. Strain to remove all evidence of leaves, unless you think you can get away with leaving them in. Top with a slice of lime for proof that the green color is not suspicious. Chill and enjoy!

 

They will be like a tree planted by the water that sends out its roots by the stream. It does not fear when heat comes; its leaves are always green.  Jeremiah 17:8a

Cilantro Ranch Fish Salad

funny fishMy apologies for not having a photo for this recipe. As I was polishing off the leftovers for breakfast this morning, I thought “I should share this recipe.” Then I looked down at the empty bowl and thought “Oops.”

It started as an attempt to recreate some fast food burritos my son likes and merged with an attempt to clean out the refrigerator after no one wanted to finish off some very blah leftover fish. Add some celery and voila! Poseidon would be proud.

 

Ingredients:

1/2 cup plain yogurt

1/2 – 1 cup fresh cilantro, minced

1 package Ranch mix

4 stalks celery, chopped

1 1/2 -2 cups cooked and flaked fish, any kind, even fishy tasting ones

 

Directions:

  1. Mix.
  2. Eat. In a sandwich, on a salad, with a spoon, etc.
  3. Share. Maybe.

 

He (Jesus) called out to them, “Friends, haven’t you any fish?”  John 21:5b

 

My total this week for ab exercises: 18 minutes. Keep up the good work! Let me know your total in the comments.

Salmon Burgers

In our heart health series, salmon keeps popping up as an important source of Omega-3s, magnesium, blah blah blah, it’s delicious and good for us, but can also be expensive. Today’s recipe uses canned salmon which is fairly cheap and already cooked which makes it quick and easy. Everything in the can is edible, including the bones and skin, but if consuming a creature’s backbone weirds you out, just drain, dump on a plate, and fish out the bits you don’t want. The little bones are a pain in the rib to remove plus they’re edible (think celery texture) and full of calcium , so go ahead and leave them in there.  You’re not being lazy, you’re being healthy.20171119_115210_HDR

Ingredients:

1 can salmon

1/3 cup onion, chopped

1/3 cup green bell pepper, chopped

1/3 cup bread crumbs

2 eggs

¼ cup feta cheese, crumbled

2 Tb lemon juice

Salt and pepper to taste

1-2 Tb oil

 

Directions:

Drain salmon. (Optional: remove backbone and skin.) Mix all ingredients except oil. Form 5-6 patties ½ inch thick.

Heat pan on medium heat and add oil. Fry salmon burgers 2 minutes on each side until golden brown.

Recipe: Beans and Greens

As I research heart health, two foods keep coming up as good for your heart: leafy greens and beans (red and yellow, black and white, they’re delicious in our sight). So in honor of heart health, here’s a quick, easy, tasty recipe for Beans and Greens.

Beans and GreensIngredients:

1/2 TBS olive oil

1 small onion, chopped (approx. 1/2 cup)

1/2 cup water

2 tsp beef bullion paste (or 1 packet powdered)

4 cloves garlic, minced

8 cups kale, chopped into 1-2″ pieces (approx 6-8 oz)

1 cup broccoli slaw

1 can beans, drained and rinsed (approx 2 cups)

Parmesan cheese, grated

salt to taste

Directions:

  1. Heat oil in 6 quart stock pot over medium heat. Saute onions for 2 minutes.
  2. Dissolve beef bullion in water, add to pot, and stir. Add garlic and kale, stir, cover and cook 5 minutes.
  3. Add broccoli slaw and beans, stir. Cover and cook 5 minutes.
  4. Salt to taste. Top with Parmesan cheese and serve.

Clean Out the Fridge Soup

 

Clean Out the Fridge Soup is one of my favorites.  You cook it -from scratch- using whatever leftovers and neglected produce are in your fridge. The resulting soup is different every time and your Tupperware is set free and reunited in the cabinet.

Let’s get started!

Step 1: Pull out all of your dilapidated vegetables and abandoned meat, especially the ones that are hiding in dark corners.  Be brave, but not stupid.  Give the meat a sniff, and inspect the plants. Wilted does not mean inedible; plants don’t need to be pretty to be soup.

4Step 2: Put the soup pot on the stove and turn the burner on to medium or medium high.

Step 3: Chop up a medium onion and mince 2-3 cloves of garlic.  If you’re adding celery, mushrooms, or raw meat, chop those too. When the pot is hot, add your choice of fat: oil, butter, bacon, etc. Olive oil is the healthiest, but butter and bacon add flavor. When the fat is hot, sauté the onion and garlic (and celery and mushrooms and meat) until tender or, in the case of meat, browned.

The vegetables in soup are like a contemporary music band; the right combination creates beautiful harmonies.  Onion and garlic are your lead vocals and your keyboard or guitar, water and salt/seasoning are the sound wave vibrations that your ears translate into music.  Without these, it’s just not a band. (If you’re not a fan of onion and/or garlic, you need remedial eating classes.)

Leftover cooked meat can be added later since it only needs to be heated, not cooked. Remember that you can mix your meats…one serving of meatloaf, a chicken leg, half a pork chop, etc.

Step 4: Add water.  I add about 6 cups of water.  If that feels like too much for your family, start with less.  If your soup gets crowded, you can always add more water later.

5Step 5: Choose and chop up your veggies; smaller is generally better, but go with whatever you prefer.  If you use a food processor, your kids won’t be able to pick out the tiny bits in the broth.

Celery, carrots, zucchini, spinach, broccoli, kale, etc are your drums.  You can make a band without them, but why bother?  If the point of soup is to give your body nutrients, don’t leave out the colored plants.

Corn, meat, okra, turnips, squash, sweet potato, etc are the violins and harmonicas.  If you like them, they add a special flare to the band.  If you don’t like them, don’t add them; no harm done.

Beets are divas with control over the volume of their own microphones.  I like beets, but I don’t add them to soup unless I want beet soup.  You will only taste the diva.

Boil your soup just as long as you need to in order for everything to be tender.  If you chop your ingredients small, they cook in 10 minutes or less.

Step 6: Add cooked leftovers. Now that your veggies are tender, add cooked meat, cooked rice, lentils, cheese, etc. Lower the heat and simmer the soup for five minutes to heat up the additions.

Step 7: Add seasoning. The easiest way to add seasoning is to add bullion paste, cubes, or packets.  Bullion gives you seasoning and salt all in one easy step.  Add a little, taste, add more if needed, taste. This is also when you can add herbs, pepper, or spices.  When in doubt, let Simon and Garfunkel guide you: add “Parsley, Sage, Rosemary, and Thyme”.

3Step 8: Add the secret ingredient: salt.  I used to have trouble making soup.  At first I would throw a lot of things into a pot and serve it.  My husband got a few nasty surprises since he was generally the first one to taste it, so I started sampling dinner before dishing it.  If a soup didn’t taste right, I’d add a little of this or that or those and finally my husband would ask “did you add salt?”  It only took me five years to start listening to him.  Before you despair, add a little salt and taste. Add a little more and taste.  It’s very hard to take extra salt back out. If you over salt, try adding potato.

When it tastes good, soup’s done.

I know it can be nerve wracking to cook without a recipe. Some of you are panicking right now!  NO recipe?  That’s ludicrous!  Anarchy won’t help me, Katie!  Calm down and start by clicking here.  It will lead you to a page with multiple soup recipes.  Experiment when you feel comfortable.  Anarchy comes with practice!

“So they ate and were filled, and they took up seven large baskets of leftover fragments.” Mark 8:8

Cuddle Up, it’s Chili

2015-september-274

I decided to post this chili recipe for two reasons. 1. Winter winds have finally hit Delaware in full force and my fingers are numb. 2. It’s what I’m making for dinner today and I can’t wait to eat it.

INGREDIENTS:

2 (14.5 oz) cans diced tomatoes, not drained

2 (14.5 oz) cans kidney beans, drained (or pinto beans, or a combination of beans)

 1 lb lean ground beef

1 lb ground Italian sausage (or substitute all beef or all turkey Italian sausage)

1 large onion

3 stalks celery

1 green bell pepper

1 red bell pepper

1 medium zucchini

3 cloves garlic

1 TBS Worcestershire sauce

1 TBS chili powder

1 TBS dried oregano

2 tsp ground cumin

1 tsp dried basil

1 tsp cayenne pepper

1 tsp paprika

1 tsp white sugar

1 tsp salt (Kosher or sea salt is best)

1 tsp black pepper (fresh ground is best)

DIRECTIONS:

Chop onion, celery, peppers, and zucchini. Mince the garlic.

Cook the ground beef, ground sausage, onion, celery, zucchini, and peppers over medium high heat until the meats are evenly browned.

Add the rest of the ingredients and stir well. Cover and simmer over medium low heat for 30 minutes. Serve.

YIELD:

8-10 cups

NOTES:

If you have the time, feel free to simmer longer or once the meats are brown and the veggies are tender, throw it all in a slow cooker for the afternoon.

The splurge of spices makes this chili spectacular and allows for alterations. For example, I’m out of bell peppers, but I have a bag of frozen chopped chard, so I’ll throw that in instead. Voila!